Spring’s Trying

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Despite the snow a few days ago–and despite the fact that it can snow here for another 6 weeks or so–spring is doing its best to cheer us up.

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The rose foliage is fairly far along for this time of year. Traditional planting for bare root roses–and pruning of traditional types–would be about the first week of April.

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This is a crabapple leafing out. All the fruit from last season hasn’t even been consumed by returning migratory birds yet.

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This is the bud of a dwarf Korean lilac. This usually blooms for me at the end of May. It seems as if it will be earlier this year.

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Finally this is my weeping cherry. It normally blooms before the crabapple. This year, who knows? It is always gorgeous when it does bloom.

Spring clearly is trying to help keep our spirits up!

Spring’s Progress

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On Friday these little bulbs were just green shoots on top of a stereo. You may remember that this is where I had a pink bulb and a white one in full color.

I also mentioned that I had brought 2 more up from the basement that had been started just a month ago.

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Here they are. They are already showing evidence of blooming in 4 weeks time. You may wonder how this can be, when the original bulbs took 8-9 weeks.

Two reasons. First these bulbs, although they weren’t planted, have been in the same cool spot as the others so they have been chilled for the same amount of time.

Next, we are closer to spring (even though spring comes in July in my climate–we’re still closer now than we were in November). And all plants, even bulbs, can tell that. So once they are given a signal to wake up, they do so more quickly than they do in November.

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My “white” amaryllis continues to be interesting. It’s probably more interesting than a plain white one would have been. So that turned into a gift, I suppose.

Next week I will be out of state. It will be interesting to see what the flowers of the south are doing.

A Taste of Spring

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Remember these?

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Here they are, in their full glory.

(Please disregard the background. It’s a Civil War artifact that belongs to the Spoiler. It was his family’s).

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And here are the next two, coming along right behind them. Spring bulbs in the dead of winter require a little planning. These were started Thanksgiving weekend (the last weekend of November for my non-United States readers).

Once I saw the above 2 coming along so nicely (the first photo), I started 2 more–roughly the last weekend in December as I recall. And as soon as these two bloomers finish up, I will start 2 more (I only have 6 forcing vases, so I kind of stagger the starting 2 at a time).

But this is the perfect time for all of these to start blooming. It’s when it’s the coldest here and when we are likely to have the most snow. It’s a full month before any of the flower shows start. It doesn’t get any better than this for me.

Oh, and did I mention hyacinths are fragrant? Ah, spring!

Winter Bulbs

Technically this post isn’t about true winter bulbs, which in my climate would be things like winter aconite and snowdrops. Rather, it’s about the indoor bulbs, both tender and hardy, that I force into bloom to get me through winter!

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You already saw these on New Year’s. These are paperwhite narcissus, often just called paperwhites. They are ridiculously easy to force:set the bulbs on some rocks or gravel and wait 4-6 weeks depending on your house temperature.

The thing about paperwhites is that they are very fragrant. You like them or you don’t. So if you have not had them before, don’t buy dozens until you know if you like the scent.

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The next typical indoor winter bulb is the amaryllis. These are often sold loose, or as kits, with soil, pots and bulbs together. I have even seen them sold just as a bulb with a waxy coating: no soil or pot needed. For me, who keeps hers from year to year, that’s not sustainable, because of course you can’t do that with the coated bulb.

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Finally here are some less traditional choices. In my case, these are hyacinth. I find they are really the only ones worth forcing all winter. I started these around Thanksgiving. And I have more coming behind them so that I should have hyacinths for the rest of the winter.

Why do I say these are the only ones worth forcing? Personal preference is part of it. But once they bloom, there is often a second bud as well so there’s an exceptional bloom time. And they’re fragrant. So it’s all good.

All of that adds up to a win for me!