Succulent Corner

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One of the first things that you might notice is that I have tagged this post “house plants.” That’s not because succulents aren’t hardy for me: it’s just that I have very poor clay soil. And nature has been over-performing in the moisture area in the last couple of years so succulents are not something that I try to grow in the ground very often.

In fact, about the only place that I can grow them is where the bedrock juts out of our yard. I have some success growing succulents on the rock face of that stone. This is what that looks like.

But for the most part, I keep my succulents indoors, although they do migrate out to the sun porch for a “summer” vacation.

After all, even plants should enjoy the little bit of summer that we get here in the frozen north.

Know Your Exposure

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I mentioned that our trees are usually in full leaf by the first week of May. One of the things that does is change the light inside our house.

Obviously this photo was taken on one of our innumerable rainy days. But you can pretty much tell that even on a sunny day, this window is not going to get much sun. Why am I even making an issue of this?

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This is what’s in that window. And from October until just about now, it’s fine. Now I am praying for some warm weather so that I can get all these (or most of them anyway) outside for the summer where they will be much happier.

So if your house plants suddenly start looking a little peaked, take a look at what’s happened to your indoor light. Perhaps, like mine, it’s gotten a little shadier than your plants care for.

Ways of Seeing

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I had this photo of my clivia miniata up just a little over a week ago on a “Wordless Wednesday.”

I’m posting it again today for a different reason. As we begin to fully enter spring in the northern hemisphere, I want to remind everyone to take time to really look at flowers. (So I guess you can tell that while I am a little too young to have been a “hippie,” I definitely believe in that stopping to smell the flowers–and to look closely at them–is a good thing!)

I remember distinctly a time when I said to someone how much I loved tulips because there were so many colors held within just one flower.The person looked at me as if I had 3 heads. But I would say the same thing about this lovely clivia flower.

Of course it’s a screaming orange color at first glance. That’s what attracts our gaze. But I am willing to believe that is what attracts pollinators to this beautiful flower (in its natural habitat, of course–not in my living room!)

Once the pollinators notice, I suspect they are lured in by the other coloration. I have read that bees don’t see red very well–they see it as a muddy dark color–and that’s why hummingbirds know that red flowers will have nectar left, for example.

There are some fabulous internet videos of the way bees see color–if you’re interested, take a look!

But the yellow throat of this clivia probably shows up as screaming, shocking fuschia to a bee!

And I adore the three delicate white scallops leading to the yellow throats of each petal.

Next time you have a flowering plant in bloom, take a closer look. Who knows what you’ll see?

Who Knew Plants Could Be Helpful?

Happy Spring! From here on out, were are in the 3 months most likely to be “spring-like,” hence this day, March 1, begins meteorological spring. It’s all going to get better–or warmer–from here, no groundhog required.

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Gardeners know that plants can be helpful in many different ways so the title of my post is kind of silly, really. But this particular plant, a tropical pitcher plant called nepenthes ventricosa is helpful in ways that aren’t immediately obvious.

First, I want to say that it’s looking a little wimpy right now. I just cut the last of the big red pitchers that it had from last summer off. That’s really what led me to this post. The pitcher was full of liquid so I dumped the liquid into the sink and out came a dead hornet. Aha! I thought. That’s where that hornet that was bumbling around in here about a month or so ago went.

These tiny green pitchers have all formed since I brought the plant in for the winter. Any hornets who find their way in now are on their own until the plant goes back outside for spring.

There was a vendor at our Flower and Garden Show offering these for sale. I suspect folks who bought these might have been given the instruction to collect rainwater or some such thing. I know every time I acquire a carnivorous plant, that’s what I am told.

That’s nice to do if you’re not in the middle of February in the freezing north. What I do instead is I fill a watering can with tap water and let it sit overnight at least. Longer is better. Many of the harmful “stuff” in the water evaporates out that way.

Something must be working–this plant is 2 years old. Maybe it likes its diet of scavenged hornets.

Patience Rewarded

Back when I worked in retail gardening, my #1 question was about hydrangeas and how to get them to reliably rebloom.

Now that I speak about a lot of different topics, my #1 question is about clivias and how to get them to rebloom. And while I can tell you, even I haven’t always had success following my own instructions.

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I am not sure what I did differently this year but I am going to finally get a bloom. Here’s what worked.

Ideally this how you get a clivia to bloom. It has to do with cooler temperatures and dryness in the fall and early winter. Each year, I stop watering the clivia around Labor Day. It seems crazy but don’t water at all from early September until January 22. You would think that the plant would die but no.

It also needs very cool temperature–just above freezing really, about 40 degrees. That’s hard for most folks to achieve. I have a glassed in sun porch with a thermometer. I left it out there and watched it very carefully.

Once temperatures dropped near 40 degrees Fahrenheit on the porch, I brought it inside,but to a very cool room. It got very little light. Apparently it didn’t care. I was so surprised to se the flower stalk forming even before I started watering.

Once I saw the flower stalk, I brought it into the light and began watering. Now it’s just patience.