Calatheas

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These plants, as you can tell by the photo, come in a variety of different types. They all take low light, which is nice because you get a lot of color and texture from a plant that essentially will grow in a dark place.

One thing that I will caution you about: they do want to remain “evenly moist,” which is a lot harder to do than it sounds.

As a general rule, plants are killed by over-watering, so don’t just water every day. Yet you do want the surface of the soil to be moist at all times. What I do is to check the pots a couple of times a week and when they are dry, I water the plants from the bottom. That seems to be working.

Another way to do this–since these are rather small pots and the plants are fairly full in them–is to soak them completely by letting them fill with water several times at a sink until the water drains completely through. That will hold them for quite some time for me (there’s no way for me to tell you how long it will work in your house–my house may be warmer–or cooler–or brighter–or darker than yours. You will get to know after one or two waterings like this).

These plants are readily available online, which is where I got mine. Good garden centers should also have some varieties of at least one or more of these. Even box stores occasionally carry them. I definitely recommend them, provided you observe the careful watering.

2 thoughts on “Calatheas

  1. tonytomeo September 17, 2018 / 10:09 pm

    They are probably more resilient to soluble toxins in water than the classic aglaonema are. The watering could be a problem though. Aglaonemas like to get a bit dry between watering.

  2. gardendaze September 18, 2018 / 5:00 am

    Interesting. I usually don’t have too much issue with that, particularly since most of my plants go outdoors for the summer and get “rainwater” bats ( especially this year–some of them nearly drowned, even those that like it wet). So any minerals, etc., from our water get a chance to wash out.

    I will watch the watering. And I just found spider mites too. Very atypical for me for this time of year. So one of them is in “seclusion” and now the whole dang collection has to be monitored.

    Karla

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